Energy bills soar by almost £230 in five years

The costs of heating a home have climbed by almost £230 since 2007, as gas and electricity prices continue to rocket, according to estimates from Uswitch.com.

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Energy price hikes have seen average household heating bills soar from an annual figure of £360 five years ago to a current figure of £587, a jump of £227. The “staggering” difference of £227 has “knocked consumers for six”, according to Uswitch.

When bills include heating, hot water and lighting, the picture gets even worse for consumers, with combined household energy bills set to hit £1,334 a year by Christmas.

Ann Robinson, director of consumer policy at Uswitch.com, said: “Many consumers are fearful of how they will afford to keep warm during the winter months. Recent price hikes from energy suppliers will add £753 million onto energy bills.

“Many households will feel that they have little choice but to turn their heating down or off, and by doing so risk gambling with their health. Three-quarters of people went without heating at some point last year, and with price hikes pushing bills even higher this figure is likely to rise.”

Many of the ‘Big Six’ energy suppliers have increased energy prices in recent months, despite many reporting an increase in profits.

Npower increased prices for both gas (8.8%) and electricity (9.1%) on 26 November, while British Gas increased prices by 6% on 16 November, adding an extra £80 a year to the average duel fuel bill. SSE also introduced a 9% increase in gas and electricity prices in October.

EDF is also set to increase prices by 10.8% from 7 December, which will see the typical standard rate dual fuel energy tariff increase by an estimated £122 to £1,251 a year.

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