Landlord Licensing Explained

Rental PropertyThere has been a lot of talk around the new Landlord License, so far in certain boroughs of London, landlords who let residential properties must now hold a valid property license.

The boroughs currently adopting the scheme are Croydon, Newham and Waltham Forest. The main issue has been the cost to the landlord that is associated with the license, which can vary by borough.

It has sparked an abundance of opinions from landlords who believe it is just another way for the government to make money, however

 

The main aim of the license is to ensure that:

  • Anti-social behaviour is dealt with effectively
  • Tenants health, safety and welfare are safe guarded
  • Landlords are ‘fit and proper’ persons or that they have employed agents who are
  • Adequate property and tenancy management arrangements are in place
  • Accommodation is suitable for the number of occupiers
  • That all landlords and managing agents operate at the same minimum level of professional standards

With so many people now renting through private landlords it is important that all legislation is being met, and of course that both tenants and landlords are protected. Some properties are exempt from needing a license under Part Three of the Housing Act 2004, for more information on this visit your local council website.

As a landlord who may be affected it is essential that you read up on the requirements, and prepare in advance the information or documentation that is required at the time of applying. Failure to comply with the new license conditions could result in a fine of up to £20,000.

The deadline to apply for a license is the 1st of October 2015, the cost of the license is £750 for 5 years, however this is reduced to £350 if you apply before the 30th September 2015.

For a one off fee Countrywide can assist you, contact property.licences@countrywide.co.uk to discuss your options.

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Posted by: Samantha Turner-Meyern Categories: Letting, Letting Agents, Uncategorized Tags: , , , , Comments Off on Landlord Licensing Explained

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